42
16 Apr 12 at 3 pm

I’ve braided bracelets before – even a necklace – so I figured how hard could this be? Turns out it’s pretty easy. Otherwise, let’s be honest, I wouldn’t have figured it out. And cheap. Yahoo!

You’ll need:

  • Cotton or jersey T-shirt you don’t mind cutting up. Or you can pick up a shirt at Goodwill. White and grey make good base colors for pastel or neon cord.
  • 1 yard of rattail cord for each bracelet. You can find lots of fun colors at JoAnn’s for 50-99 cents a yard.
  • Magnets. I got a package of 10 for $2.
  • Glue. Either hot glue or tacky glue or both.

Instructions:

1. Cut the shirt into 3 strips roughly 1-inch wide and about 12 inches long. But don’t stress cutting this precisely. The ends will roll in so you don’t need it to be pretty.

2. Cut the rattail cord into 3 10-inch pieces.

3. Anchor the top with a bobby pin or rubber band, separate into 3 strands, and start braiding.

4. When you get to the end of the braid, snip the ends, bunch all of the pieces together, and glue on the magnet.

5. Do the same to the other end. Wrap it around your wrist and make sure you have the right length before attaching the second magnet.

6. Cut two little pieces of fabric to cover over the magnet ends.

7. Fold the fabric over the magnet and glue together.



(Source.)

I’ve braided bracelets before – even a necklace – so I figured how hard could this be? Turns out it’s pretty easy. Otherwise, let’s be honest, I wouldn’t have figured it out. And cheap. Yahoo!
You’ll need:
Cotton or jersey T-shirt you don’t mind cutting up. Or you can pick up a shirt at Goodwill. White and grey make good base colors for pastel or neon cord.
1 yard of rattail cord for each bracelet. You can find lots of fun colors at JoAnn’s for 50-99 cents a yard.
Magnets. I got a package of 10 for $2.
Glue. Either hot glue or tacky glue or both.

Instructions:
1. Cut the shirt into 3 strips roughly 1-inch wide and about 12 inches long. But don’t stress cutting this precisely. The ends will roll in so you don’t need it to be pretty.
2. Cut the rattail cord into 3 10-inch pieces.
3. Anchor the top with a bobby pin or rubber band, separate into 3 strands, and start braiding.
4. When you get to the end of the braid, snip the ends, bunch all of the pieces together, and glue on the magnet.
5. Do the same to the other end. Wrap it around your wrist and make sure you have the right length before attaching the second magnet.
6. Cut two little pieces of fabric to cover over the magnet ends.
7. Fold the fabric over the magnet and glue together.

(Source.)
 13
02 Mar 12 at 6 pm

I’ve been fascinated by these Organic Wall Growers since my last visit to theNeighbourgoods Market in Braamfontein where I took these pictures of them. I was delighted to discover that you can now purchase them from The Big Heart Company’s Etsy Store.

“Plant a garden on a wall with these clever canvas plant bags. As the plant grows the bag ages organically. Each planter is packaged in a brown paper and twine parcel – all screws and washers supplied.”

The Big Heart Company is based in Salt River in Cape Town and you can have a look at their Facebook page for more beautiful things.
(Source.) 

(Source: fuckyeahmakingstuff)

 29
26 Feb 12 at 6 pm

A large cardboard box can easily and ecologically become a recyclable dollhouse.

Materials

  • cardboard box (at least 30 x 40 cm large)
  • scissors or a carpet knife
  • hot-melt glue gun or wood glue
  • pencil
  • black marker

To do this:

1. Disassemble the box by cutting off the top, bottom, ends and longer sides.

2. Plan the wall sequence with the pieces. Use a pencil to mark where the pieces meet.

3. Cut the doorway holes to the wall pieces.

4. Place the wall pieces crisscrossed and make vertical cuts, where the walls will be against each other. Make a cut from the top to the middle to the first wall and a cut from the bottom to the middle to the other. If the cuts are narrow enough, the walls will stay up even without glue.

5. Use the spare pieces of cardboard to create furniture.

6. Decorate the furniture with a black marker.
(Source.) 


A large cardboard box can easily and ecologically become a recyclable dollhouse.
Materials
cardboard box (at least 30 x 40 cm large)
scissors or a carpet knife
hot-melt glue gun or wood glue
pencil
black marker
To do this:
1. Disassemble the box by cutting off the top, bottom, ends and longer sides.
2. Plan the wall sequence with the pieces. Use a pencil to mark where the pieces meet.
3. Cut the doorway holes to the wall pieces.
4. Place the wall pieces crisscrossed and make vertical cuts, where the walls will be against each other. Make a cut from the top to the middle to the first wall and a cut from the bottom to the middle to the other. If the cuts are narrow enough, the walls will stay up even without glue.
5. Use the spare pieces of cardboard to create furniture.
6. Decorate the furniture with a black marker.(Source.) 
 42
13 Feb 12 at 12 pm

What you need to make a toothbrush bracelet:
♥Toothbrush 
♥Pliers
♥Pot and stove


DIY Toothbrush Bracelet

The first thing you need to do is put the toothbrush in boiling water. I recommend the cheapest toothbrush you can find, whether that’s at the Dollar Store or wherever— just as long as it is the simple kind. I tried this with a Snoopy toothbrush for kids and it did not work. You need the clear plastic kind.

DIY Toothbrush Bracelet

After you have let the toothbrush boil for about a minute, (or until it gets soft) you can easily pull out the bristles with your pliers. After you’ve pulled out all the bristles and those weird little metal pieces, stick the toothbrush back into the boiling pot until it becomes as floppy as Harry Potter’s boneless arm after Professor Lockhart accidentally “healed” him. (Yeah. I went there. But it really reminds me of that scene in the book! Try it. You’ll see. ;)) 

Bend the toothbrush until it fits your wrist. You might have to put it back into the boiling water to adjust sections, but if you have the right kind of toothbrush it should work well. Don’t burn yourself!

DIY Toothbrush Bracelet
(
Source.)

What you need to make a toothbrush bracelet:♥Toothbrush ♥Pliers♥Pot and stoveThe first thing you need to do is put the toothbrush in boiling water. I recommend the cheapest toothbrush you can find, whether that’s at the Dollar Store or wherever— just as long as it is the simple kind. I tried this with a Snoopy toothbrush for kids and it did not work. You need the clear plastic kind.After you have let the toothbrush boil for about a minute, (or until it gets soft) you can easily pull out the bristles with your pliers. After you’ve pulled out all the bristles and those weird little metal pieces, stick the toothbrush back into the boiling pot until it becomes as floppy as Harry Potter’s boneless arm after Professor Lockhart accidentally “healed” him. (Yeah. I went there. But it really reminds me of that scene in the book! Try it. You’ll see. ;)) Bend the toothbrush until it fits your wrist. You might have to put it back into the boiling water to adjust sections, but if you have the right kind of toothbrush it should work well. Don’t burn yourself!(Source.)
 17
03 Feb 12 at 6 pm

Aren’t they interesting looking?  The one in the back-the sort of 3d Diamond or double cone-is what I’ll show you in this tutorial.

1. Choose a book to fold. Cheap is good-this cost me $.25 at a yard sale.

2. Rip off the front & back covers, then make your first fold-in this case a triangle

3. Make any additional folds in the page. We fold the top down as well to complete the triangle.

4. Repeat.

5. Repeat again.

6. Repeat yet again.

Completed Folded Book

7. Until all pages are done!

This very simple pattern used the entire novel and took me about 2 hours to fold mindlessly while watching TV.
(Source.) 

tags: diy  crafts  paper  upcycle  recycle  decor 
Aren’t they interesting looking?  The one in the back-the sort of 3d Diamond or double cone-is what I’ll show you in this tutorial.

1. Choose a book to fold. Cheap is good-this cost me $.25 at a yard sale.


2. Rip off the front & back covers, then make your first fold-in this case a triangle


3. Make any additional folds in the page. We fold the top down as well to complete the triangle.


4. Repeat.


5. Repeat again.


6. Repeat yet again.


7. Until all pages are done!

This very simple pattern used the entire novel and took me about 2 hours to fold mindlessly while watching TV.(Source.) 
 17
05 Jan 12 at 12 am

 

Denim Sunburst Textile Art
As I mentioned before, after sifting through the book “Layered, Tattered and Stitched” by Ruth Rae I got great inspiration.  First I created a randomized denim textile wall hanging and now I have taken it one step farther and created a denim sunburst wall hanging!


The process of making the wall hanging is very simple, yet very time consuming.  I simply cut old denim jeans into small rectangular pieces of all different sizes.  Then I began to sew then one by one onto a fabric backing.  You can easily do a pre-layout design, or you can be like me and let the piece evolve on its own!

(Source.)

tags: denim  decor  diy  crafts  recycle 
 

Denim Sunburst Textile ArtAs I mentioned before, after sifting through the book “Layered, Tattered and Stitched” by Ruth Rae I got great inspiration.  First I created a randomized denim textile wall hanging and now I have taken it one step farther and created a denim sunburst wall hanging!
The process of making the wall hanging is very simple, yet very time consuming.  I simply cut old denim jeans into small rectangular pieces of all different sizes.  Then I began to sew then one by one onto a fabric backing.  You can easily do a pre-layout design, or you can be like me and let the piece evolve on its own!
(Source.)
 44
04 Jan 12 at 1 pm

Newspaper Giftbags

today I stumbled over a wonderful little tutorial of gift bags made from the Wall Street Journal. You can vary the dimensions, of course, but here’s what I used to create a bag that’s 5” tall, 4.5” wide, and 3” deep.


Stack two sheets of newspaper on top of each other. This will be a two-ply bag for extra sturdiness.


Cut out a rectangle that’s 15.5” wide and 8.25” tall. If your paper already has a fold in it, align the existing fold with one of the fold lines in the diagram below, unless you don’t mind an extra fold appearing somewhere on your bag. I cut out this rectangle, then flipped the paper over so the blue area would be on the outside of the bag.


Fold a flap 1.25” down from the top. Fold a flap 2” up from the bottom. Then measure off and make vertical folds in the places shown in the diagram above. The front and back panels are 4.5” wide, the side gussets are 3” wide, and you’ll need a 0.5” flap for gluing the bag together.


Cut two pieces of cardstock or chipboard to 4.25” x 1”, then glue them on the widest two panels just under the top fold. These will reinforce the rim of the bag. Glue the top flap down along the length of the bag, covering the cardstock. Since the bag is two-ply, you’ll need to glue both flap pieces down one at a time.


Put glue on the outside of the 0.5” tab and bring the left-most panel over to form the body of the bag, aligning the cut edge of the panel with the folded edge of the flap. Add a little more glue to make sure the outermost sheet of newsprint gets tacked down, too.


Upend the bag so the 2” flap is now up. Fold the short sides inward as if you were wrapping a present. If it seems easier, you could also lay the bag on its side and crease those folds against the table.


Put glue on both flaps and fold them inward to form the bottom of the bag. Standing the bag upright and pressing down from the inside will help to secure them.


Cut a piece of chipboard to 4” x 2.5” and glue it to the bottom of the bag to reinforce it and hide the flaps if you want to be an overachiever.


Punch holes in the rim of the bag, adding eyelets if you like, and string some cord through the holes to form handles. Knot each end of the cord so it won’t pull out through the holes.

(Source.)

tags: diy  crafts  gifts  recycle  paper  decor 
Newspaper Giftbags
today I stumbled over a wonderful little tutorial of gift bags made from the Wall Street Journal. You can vary the dimensions, of course, but here’s what I used to create a bag that’s 5” tall, 4.5” wide, and 3” deep.Stack two sheets of newspaper on top of each other. This will be a two-ply bag for extra sturdiness.Cut out a rectangle that’s 15.5” wide and 8.25” tall. If your paper already has a fold in it, align the existing fold with one of the fold lines in the diagram below, unless you don’t mind an extra fold appearing somewhere on your bag. I cut out this rectangle, then flipped the paper over so the blue area would be on the outside of the bag.Fold a flap 1.25” down from the top. Fold a flap 2” up from the bottom. Then measure off and make vertical folds in the places shown in the diagram above. The front and back panels are 4.5” wide, the side gussets are 3” wide, and you’ll need a 0.5” flap for gluing the bag together.Cut two pieces of cardstock or chipboard to 4.25” x 1”, then glue them on the widest two panels just under the top fold. These will reinforce the rim of the bag. Glue the top flap down along the length of the bag, covering the cardstock. Since the bag is two-ply, you’ll need to glue both flap pieces down one at a time.Put glue on the outside of the 0.5” tab and bring the left-most panel over to form the body of the bag, aligning the cut edge of the panel with the folded edge of the flap. Add a little more glue to make sure the outermost sheet of newsprint gets tacked down, too.Upend the bag so the 2” flap is now up. Fold the short sides inward as if you were wrapping a present. If it seems easier, you could also lay the bag on its side and crease those folds against the table.Put glue on both flaps and fold them inward to form the bottom of the bag. Standing the bag upright and pressing down from the inside will help to secure them.Cut a piece of chipboard to 4” x 2.5” and glue it to the bottom of the bag to reinforce it and hide the flaps if you want to be an overachiever.Punch holes in the rim of the bag, adding eyelets if you like, and string some cord through the holes to form handles. Knot each end of the cord so it won’t pull out through the holes.
(Source.)
 4
03 Jan 12 at 6 pm

My Denim Textile Wall Hanging

As I previously said, after flipping through the book “Layered, Tattered and Stitched” by Ruth Rae, I had great motivation to try my own project.

Well here is was my outcome:
A recycled denim textile wall hanging!



(Source.)

tags: diy  crafts  decor  denim  recycle 
 
My Denim Textile Wall Hanging
As I previously said, after flipping through the book “Layered, Tattered and Stitched” by Ruth Rae, I had great motivation to try my own project.

Well here is was my outcome:A recycled denim textile wall hanging!



(Source.)