12
30 Apr 12 at 3 pm

☩DIY☩ Rhinestone Friendship Bracelet

Things you need for this DIY:
✝ embroidery thread
✝ rhinestone necklace
✝ scissors
✝ embroidery needle
✝ wire cutters (you can just use the scissors if you don’t care about them)
✝ jump rings
✝ tape measure (optional)


Total time:
1 hour


Total cost:
My rhinestone necklace was $15 but check your local Claire’s!

I need more bling in my life.

First, cut 26 strands of thread measuring three times the circumference of your wrist. Then separate into two groups of 12 and one group of 2.

Tie a knot in the end of one of the strands of 12 and braid it.

Do it again with the other.

Use one of the extras to sew the two braids together. I wanted it to be neat so I tied the end to the fringe…

…then I threaded it through the knot.

Sew.


Voila!

Clip the excess rhinestones off. 

Then use the last strand of thread to sew the rhinestones onto the braid. I threaded it through the knot, the same as before.
The great thing about using a necklace is you can just reuse the clasp.
You could skip the whole first part of this and use a friendship bracelet or make a big braid with yarn and just attach the rhinestones. Make it your own.

Uh, hello, I’m super fancy.
Have a party!
(Source.) 
☩DIY☩ Rhinestone Friendship Bracelet



Things you need for this DIY:✝ embroidery thread✝ rhinestone necklace✝ scissors✝ embroidery needle✝ wire cutters (you can just use the scissors if you don’t care about them)✝ jump rings✝ tape measure (optional)Total time:1 hourTotal cost:My rhinestone necklace was $15 but check your local Claire’s!


I need more bling in my life.




First, cut 26 strands of thread measuring three times the circumference of your wrist. Then separate into two groups of 12 and one group of 2.


Tie a knot in the end of one of the strands of 12 and braid it.


Do it again with the other.


Use one of the extras to sew the two braids together. I wanted it to be neat so I tied the end to the fringe…


…then I threaded it through the knot.


Sew.
Voila!



Clip the excess rhinestones off. 


Then use the last strand of thread to sew the rhinestones onto the braid. I threaded it through the knot, the same as before.



The great thing about using a necklace is you can just reuse the clasp.

You could skip the whole first part of this and use a friendship bracelet or make a big braid with yarn and just attach the rhinestones. Make it your own.



Uh, hello, I’m super fancy.







Have a party!(Source.) 
 10
25 Apr 12 at 3 pm

DIY: Oil Reed Diffuser From A Perfume Bottle


 


Awaken your senses! Give that empty perfume bottle on your dresser a second life and turn it into a reed diffuser. A perfume bottle is the perfect container for creating diffusers with its elegant shape that will add a decorative touch to any room and its small opening to slowly release the fragrance, filling your home with a long-lasting aroma. Regardless of the scent you choose, a handmade diffuser will always smell a little sweeter.

Materials: Empty Perfume Bottle — Sharp Needle Nose Pliers — Bamboo Skewers (found at supermarkets or craft stores) — Black Acrylic Paint — Decorative Paper (I repurposed mine from an old Bloomingdale’s catalog) — Foam Brush — Double-Sided Tape or Tape Runner —Diffuser Oil (check outCurbly to learn how to make your own from scratch)

Steps: 
• Pull off the spray nozzle from the bottle.
• With pliers, grip the round metal piece around the neck of the bottle and pull it off.
• You should now be left with another metal piece that’s adjoined to the neck of the bottle. Insert the tip of your pliers under one section of the metal and gently begin to pry upward (tip: this step may take some more time for certain bottles. Try using an x-acto knife or scissors if your bottle is giving you trouble). Repeat this step around the entire neck of the bottle.
• Once the metal piece has loosened, use the pliers again to pull it out, removing it from the bottle.
• Paint the skewers with acrylic paint using a foam brush.
• Adhere a little bit of tape to the background paper you have chosen and attach it to the back of the bottle.
• To hide any logos on the bottle, simply add some more decorative paper to the front of the bottle.
• Add diffuser oil and arrange sticks.
(Source.) 
tags: diy  crafts  decor  diffuser  chanel 
DIY: Oil Reed Diffuser From A Perfume Bottle












 

Awaken your senses! Give that empty perfume bottle on your dresser a second life and turn it into a reed diffuser. A perfume bottle is the perfect container for creating diffusers with its elegant shape that will add a decorative touch to any room and its small opening to slowly release the fragrance, filling your home with a long-lasting aroma. Regardless of the scent you choose, a handmade diffuser will always smell a little sweeter.Materials: Empty Perfume Bottle — Sharp Needle Nose Pliers — Bamboo Skewers (found at supermarkets or craft stores) — Black Acrylic Paint — Decorative Paper (I repurposed mine from an old Bloomingdale’s catalog) — Foam Brush — Double-Sided Tape or Tape Runner —Diffuser Oil (check outCurbly to learn how to make your own from scratch)Steps: • Pull off the spray nozzle from the bottle.• With pliers, grip the round metal piece around the neck of the bottle and pull it off.• You should now be left with another metal piece that’s adjoined to the neck of the bottle. Insert the tip of your pliers under one section of the metal and gently begin to pry upward (tip: this step may take some more time for certain bottles. Try using an x-acto knife or scissors if your bottle is giving you trouble). Repeat this step around the entire neck of the bottle.• Once the metal piece has loosened, use the pliers again to pull it out, removing it from the bottle.• Paint the skewers with acrylic paint using a foam brush.• Adhere a little bit of tape to the background paper you have chosen and attach it to the back of the bottle.• To hide any logos on the bottle, simply add some more decorative paper to the front of the bottle.• Add diffuser oil and arrange sticks.(Source.) 
 6
25 Apr 12 at 12 pm

This week on MakeKind, I’m sharing a DIY pencil holder that doubles as a mini office organizer. Made from cork trivets, this project is easy to create and super functional – bonus!

MATERIALS // 6 cork trivets, power drill, 3/8″ drill bit, glue

MakeKind_Pencil_holder_001

STEPS // 01  GLUE TRIVETS  Using the glue, adhere two trivets together by stacking one directly on top of the other.

MakeKind_Pencil_holder_002MakeKind_Pencil_holder_003

02 //  STACK TRIVETS  Continue gluing each trivet to one another, making a complete stack when all six trivets are used. Press firmly when finished. (helpful hint: place a heavy item, like a book, on top of the stack when finished and allow to dry overnight)

MakeKind_Pencil_holder_004

MakeKind_Pencil_holder_005

03 //  MEASURE FOR DRILLING Measure about 2/3 down the stack of trivets and note the measurement. (Mine was 1.5″). On your drill bit, make a mark (I wrapped tape around the drill bit) of the same measurement, so you will know how far to drill into your stack.

MakeKind_Pencil_holder_006

MakeKind_Pencil_holder_007

04 // DRILL THE HOLES Using the power drill and 3/8″ drill bit, make several holes in the cork. I put one in the middle and six surrounding the middle, for a total of seven holes. You can certainly choose to make more or less holes depending on your preferences.

MakeKind_Pencil_holder_008

MakeKind_Pencil_holder_009

Fill each hole with a writing utensil and there you have it!

MakeKind_Pencil_holder_0010

The added bonus? Because the pencil holder is made from cork, it doubles as a memo board! Enjoy!
(Source.) 

tags: diy  crafts  decor  handy  organization 
This week on MakeKind, I’m sharing a DIY pencil holder that doubles as a mini office organizer. Made from cork trivets, this project is easy to create and super functional – bonus!
MATERIALS // 6 cork trivets, power drill, 3/8″ drill bit, glue

STEPS // 01  GLUE TRIVETS  Using the glue, adhere two trivets together by stacking one directly on top of the other.

02 //  STACK TRIVETS  Continue gluing each trivet to one another, making a complete stack when all six trivets are used. Press firmly when finished. (helpful hint: place a heavy item, like a book, on top of the stack when finished and allow to dry overnight)


03 //  MEASURE FOR DRILLING Measure about 2/3 down the stack of trivets and note the measurement. (Mine was 1.5″). On your drill bit, make a mark (I wrapped tape around the drill bit) of the same measurement, so you will know how far to drill into your stack.


04 // DRILL THE HOLES Using the power drill and 3/8″ drill bit, make several holes in the cork. I put one in the middle and six surrounding the middle, for a total of seven holes. You can certainly choose to make more or less holes depending on your preferences.


Fill each hole with a writing utensil and there you have it!

The added bonus? Because the pencil holder is made from cork, it doubles as a memo board! Enjoy!(Source.) 
 12
24 Apr 12 at 6 pm
Rounding up the usual suspects: a selection of paints, paintbrush, scissors, cotton clothesline, and matches 
Wrap the clothesline around your finger to determine ring size or around your wrist if you want to go bracelet.

Leave a tiny bit of wiggle room because you’ll lose a bit when you seal the ends together. 
(With those matches. Yes, there is fire in this tutorial.)

Instead of making paint puddles on my magazine work surface, I used the paint caps. Keep it clean, I say.
I like to hold the clothesline thusly. I definitely do not mind getting paint on my fingers.
Give your clothesline a good coat of paint. Over, under, and all around. 
I went for stripes and blocks of color, and I decided leaving the natural cotton rope was also nice. 
Let the paint dry. I didn’t really time it—a couple hours should be adequate. Once dry, form the rope into a circular shape. The paint will make it stiff, so you might have to bend it a bit to loosen things up. 
Now you’ll burn both the ends. Eeek! Only adults for this step.
As soon as the end heats up, the synthetic interior of the clothesline will get all melty. 
That’s your cue to smoosh the two ends together. They’ll stick like glue.
Brush off the ashy bits and…Voila! Aww look, it’s a brand new ring!
Now, I did wonder about burning the ends of the clothesline, like if there might be a less smokey way to go. But I tried a couple glues and found the results messy, and corralling the wild and wooly ends of the clothesline, as it started to unravel, was pretty difficult with glue alone. The matches are a nice option because they melt all those flyaway bits together and really do form a tight bond. I’ve been wearing my rings for a week now and haven’t had any issues with things coming undone or the soot factor, so I’m sticking with fire. Duh, of course I am. I would, however, like to give them a coat of Modge Podge, so they don’t get all soggy when I wash my hands…also so the natural cotton parts don’t end up looking like Monika’s white fannypack. You know, all gray and sad, yet well-loved. Always well-loved.

But that, my dears, is for another day. Right now, I’m just going to enjoy this neon nostalgia. 

(Source.)


Rounding up the usual suspects: a selection of paints, paintbrush, scissors, cotton clothesline, and matches 



Wrap the clothesline around your finger to determine ring size or around your wrist if you want to go bracelet.
Leave a tiny bit of wiggle room because you’ll lose a bit when you seal the ends together. (With those matches. Yes, there is fire in this tutorial.)



Instead of making paint puddles on my magazine work surface, I used the paint caps. Keep it clean, I say.



I like to hold the clothesline thusly. I definitely do not mind getting paint on my fingers.



Give your clothesline a good coat of paint. Over, under, and all around. 



I went for stripes and blocks of color, and I decided leaving the natural cotton rope was also nice. 




Let the paint dry. I didn’t really time it—a couple hours should be adequate. Once dry, form the rope into a circular shape. The paint will make it stiff, so you might have to bend it a bit to loosen things up. 



Now you’ll burn both the ends. Eeek! Only adults for this step.



As soon as the end heats up, the synthetic interior of the clothesline will get all melty. 



That’s your cue to smoosh the two ends together. They’ll stick like glue.



Brush off the ashy bits and…Voila! Aww look, it’s a brand new ring!



Now, I did wonder about burning the ends of the clothesline, like if there might be a less smokey way to go. But I tried a couple glues and found the results messy, and corralling the wild and wooly ends of the clothesline, as it started to unravel, was pretty difficult with glue alone. The matches are a nice option because they melt all those flyaway bits together and really do form a tight bond. I’ve been wearing my rings for a week now and haven’t had any issues with things coming undone or the soot factor, so I’m sticking with fire. Duh, of course I am. I would, however, like to give them a coat of Modge Podge, so they don’t get all soggy when I wash my hands…also so the natural cotton parts don’t end up looking like Monika’s white fannypack. You know, all gray and sad, yet well-loved. Always well-loved.But that, my dears, is for another day. Right now, I’m just going to enjoy this neon nostalgia. 


(Source.)
(Source 1, 2)
 10
23 Apr 12 at 6 pm

So creating your own Anthropologie Marjorelle Necklace isn’t so hard.

All you need, is 3 different looking brooches, you can go any theme, butterflies, flowers, leaves etc.
I chose flowers, so make sure they are more or less similar in sizes, they don’t have to be exact, but not too far apart in sizes too, unless you can make it work of course.
Choosing them in similar shades or colours will be better, or else you can just spray paint them. Which on a side note then I would not encourage you to use vintage or expensive brooches if you are going to paint them - just get those cheap ones. I got mine for a few for a couple of dollars.

Then just clip the brooches on a rope/velvet/strong satin ribbon. I chose a pale gold rope for mine [like those they use to make curtain tassles].




Attach a clasp at the ends of the ropes and you have yourself an Inspired Anthropologie Marjorelle Necklace.
(Source.) 

So creating your own Anthropologie Marjorelle Necklace isn’t so hard.All you need, is 3 different looking brooches, you can go any theme, butterflies, flowers, leaves etc.I chose flowers, so make sure they are more or less similar in sizes, they don’t have to be exact, but not too far apart in sizes too, unless you can make it work of course.Choosing them in similar shades or colours will be better, or else you can just spray paint them. Which on a side note then I would not encourage you to use vintage or expensive brooches if you are going to paint them - just get those cheap ones. I got mine for a few for a couple of dollars.Then just clip the brooches on a rope/velvet/strong satin ribbon. I chose a pale gold rope for mine [like those they use to make curtain tassles].





Attach a clasp at the ends of the ropes and you have yourself an Inspired Anthropologie Marjorelle Necklace.(Source.) 
 9
23 Apr 12 at 3 pm

Quick Photo Frames
Turn pretty place mats into supereasy photo frames. Simply glue or tape a photo to the center of each place mat, then use removable adhesive squares to hang the finished pieces. For a hip retro look, use classic vinyl records for frames.
(Source.)

tags: diy  crafts  decor 
Quick Photo FramesTurn pretty place mats into supereasy photo frames. Simply glue or tape a photo to the center of each place mat, then use removable adhesive squares to hang the finished pieces. For a hip retro look, use classic vinyl records for frames.(Source.)
 16
16 Apr 12 at 6 pm

diy vintage lace bag mod podge

What you need for this DIY vintage lace bag

- an old leather bag or purse
- lace
- Mod Podge
- brush
- Fabric glue
- scissors

diy vintage lace bag mod podge

How to make a fabulous vintage lace purse

First you have to decide which part of the bag should be covered in lace. Cut the lace a little bigger then that area, you will cut off the excess lace later on. Use the brush to put the Mod Podge on the bag. Put the lace on top of the Mod Podge and at another layer of Mod Podge to secure the lace. Let the Mod Podge dry. If you are not really patient, like me, you can use a blow dryer to speed up the drying process. Cut the lace in the right shape. To make the edges of the lace stay in place I used a little bit of fabric glue. This way you know for sure (well almost for sure) that this bag will stay just as beautiful as the day you made it.
(Source.) 


What you need for this DIY vintage lace bag
- an old leather bag or purse- lace- Mod Podge- brush- Fabric glue- scissors

How to make a fabulous vintage lace purse
First you have to decide which part of the bag should be covered in lace. Cut the lace a little bigger then that area, you will cut off the excess lace later on. Use the brush to put the Mod Podge on the bag. Put the lace on top of the Mod Podge and at another layer of Mod Podge to secure the lace. Let the Mod Podge dry. If you are not really patient, like me, you can use a blow dryer to speed up the drying process. Cut the lace in the right shape. To make the edges of the lace stay in place I used a little bit of fabric glue. This way you know for sure (well almost for sure) that this bag will stay just as beautiful as the day you made it.(Source.) 
 43
16 Apr 12 at 3 pm

I’ve braided bracelets before – even a necklace – so I figured how hard could this be? Turns out it’s pretty easy. Otherwise, let’s be honest, I wouldn’t have figured it out. And cheap. Yahoo!

You’ll need:

  • Cotton or jersey T-shirt you don’t mind cutting up. Or you can pick up a shirt at Goodwill. White and grey make good base colors for pastel or neon cord.
  • 1 yard of rattail cord for each bracelet. You can find lots of fun colors at JoAnn’s for 50-99 cents a yard.
  • Magnets. I got a package of 10 for $2.
  • Glue. Either hot glue or tacky glue or both.

Instructions:

1. Cut the shirt into 3 strips roughly 1-inch wide and about 12 inches long. But don’t stress cutting this precisely. The ends will roll in so you don’t need it to be pretty.

2. Cut the rattail cord into 3 10-inch pieces.

3. Anchor the top with a bobby pin or rubber band, separate into 3 strands, and start braiding.

4. When you get to the end of the braid, snip the ends, bunch all of the pieces together, and glue on the magnet.

5. Do the same to the other end. Wrap it around your wrist and make sure you have the right length before attaching the second magnet.

6. Cut two little pieces of fabric to cover over the magnet ends.

7. Fold the fabric over the magnet and glue together.



(Source.)

I’ve braided bracelets before – even a necklace – so I figured how hard could this be? Turns out it’s pretty easy. Otherwise, let’s be honest, I wouldn’t have figured it out. And cheap. Yahoo!
You’ll need:
Cotton or jersey T-shirt you don’t mind cutting up. Or you can pick up a shirt at Goodwill. White and grey make good base colors for pastel or neon cord.
1 yard of rattail cord for each bracelet. You can find lots of fun colors at JoAnn’s for 50-99 cents a yard.
Magnets. I got a package of 10 for $2.
Glue. Either hot glue or tacky glue or both.

Instructions:
1. Cut the shirt into 3 strips roughly 1-inch wide and about 12 inches long. But don’t stress cutting this precisely. The ends will roll in so you don’t need it to be pretty.
2. Cut the rattail cord into 3 10-inch pieces.
3. Anchor the top with a bobby pin or rubber band, separate into 3 strands, and start braiding.
4. When you get to the end of the braid, snip the ends, bunch all of the pieces together, and glue on the magnet.
5. Do the same to the other end. Wrap it around your wrist and make sure you have the right length before attaching the second magnet.
6. Cut two little pieces of fabric to cover over the magnet ends.
7. Fold the fabric over the magnet and glue together.

(Source.)
 497
16 Apr 12 at 12 pm

what you’ll need:
• 2 yds cotton webbing (we used 1 1/2 inch natural cotton)
• masking tape
• acrylic craft paint
• 2 swivel hooks (found in the jewelry or with purse handle section of most craft stores)
• fabric glue
• needle and thread
• metallic leather or vinyl (optional)


let’s get to it…


the steps:
• measure out the desired length of your strap and add 2 inches.
• on a work surface use tape to create a geometric design taking care to make sure tape is fully adhered to the webbing. We used the rounded side of a bone folder to smooth the edges on the tape to be sure our paint line were crisp.
• now the fun part, apply paint to webbing. Be sure paint is dry before attempting to remove tape. Watching paint dry is a skill that takes practice.


• now that your strap is looking amazing, slide the ends through the swivel hook giving yourself about an inch of strapping on the reverse side and glue. Be sure to give the hook a little bit of space to move when gluing.
• because you’re hanging your beloved camera around your neck add a few stitches to the glued area for good measure!

** small side note, if you have a rather heavy DSLR you may want to choose a wider strapping than what you can fit through the hardware of the swivel hook. To accommodate this we used a piece of metallic leather to create an adapter that we then glued and sewed to the end of the painted strap.


now you’re ready to take your made up camera to the streets & show her off.

(Source.)

what you’ll need:• 2 yds cotton webbing (we used 1 1/2 inch natural cotton)• masking tape• acrylic craft paint• 2 swivel hooks (found in the jewelry or with purse handle section of most craft stores)• fabric glue• needle and thread• metallic leather or vinyl (optional)
let’s get to it…
the steps:• measure out the desired length of your strap and add 2 inches.• on a work surface use tape to create a geometric design taking care to make sure tape is fully adhered to the webbing. We used the rounded side of a bone folder to smooth the edges on the tape to be sure our paint line were crisp.• now the fun part, apply paint to webbing. Be sure paint is dry before attempting to remove tape. Watching paint dry is a skill that takes practice.
• now that your strap is looking amazing, slide the ends through the swivel hook giving yourself about an inch of strapping on the reverse side and glue. Be sure to give the hook a little bit of space to move when gluing.• because you’re hanging your beloved camera around your neck add a few stitches to the glued area for good measure!
** small side note, if you have a rather heavy DSLR you may want to choose a wider strapping than what you can fit through the hardware of the swivel hook. To accommodate this we used a piece of metallic leather to create an adapter that we then glued and sewed to the end of the painted strap.
now you’re ready to take your made up camera to the streets & show her off.
(Source.)